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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
and that right common law right the colonists the needed the guns here whereas most england they didn't, and so people soon came to have an enormous facility and knowledge of firearms and of course as we all know it proves the result of victory against the most powerful military country in the world with of the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and again i think people get different views in history, and it comes from movies or tv a lot of times. but when we have the revolutionary period what was the role of guns in the militia or these requirements that we talk about? >> guest: george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he growled about a lot of times but also made some remarks that aloud how the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certa
's not done yet, he's okay. and new controversial immigration gun law coming up. can the mexican government have a say how the u.s. deals with illegal immigration? we'll talk to arizona attorney general tom thorn, he weighs in on the ongoing legal battle. >> jamie: plus, a defiant act against president obama's health care law. an update on the u.s. company facing millions of dollars in fines for refusing to comply. >> kelly: and taking a stand in the wake of the tragic school shooting massacre at sandy hook elementary. what some teachers are doing to make their classrooms safer. >> i think that a lot of people have a fear of guns and of what they can do, but i think also that maybe they're not quite educated, that sometimes the only thing we'll talk about is a good guy with a gun. >> and welcome back, everyone, we're following a major challenge to the president's health care law, the arts and crafts chain hobby lobby now saying it will not pro he vied workers with health plans that cover the morning after pill. even though the new health care law requires it. this, after the supreme court
. although knobloch or the constitution guarantees equal protection of the law, and the outlaws the whole purpose of it the 14th amendment was to outlaw racial standards. that seems pretty straightforward. there was an act of 1981 that been racial discrimination, including in regards to college tuition. it sounds pretty straightforward. think of those things not mean what they say. there is an exception in this area. you would think, well, gee, it would be an exception. it would be an exception to the principle of racial discrimination that is pretty clearly there in the law. the federal branch have spoken to that. it must be pretty strong and undeniable. it must be something like, you know, it helps us identify someone who is about to set up a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids w
of connecticut a similar law to the one adopted here banning assault weapons. this has been a heroin, terrific week in the state of connecticut, culminating in today's moment of silence at 9:30. the end of the week and i spent the better part of the time meeting with first responders, families, going to funerals and wakes and speaking with ordinary people of newtown and the state of connecticut. the refrain i have heard over and over again from newtown and connecticut and all the run the country is you need to do something about the guns. the nra statement today is sadly and shamefully inadequate, calling for more guns and rejecting real action against gun violence. at a defining a historic moment for our nation demanding courageous leadership, the nra has declined to step forward as a credible and constructive partner. the proposal for more armed guards in schools may be helpful in some instances, but it falls short of the strong, serious comprehensive action needed to stop the kind of horrific tragedy that occurred last week. many police that spoke to me on that day when we take a said that
, in the napa valley. >> glor: and that is not all. apart from the fiscal cliff debate, some other laws are due to expire january 1, and that could cost americans plenty. for starters, the payroll tax break will end. social security taxes will go from 4.2% back to 6.2%. if the farm bill is allowed to expire, it is feared milk prices could rise sharply. hundreds of american families are heartbroken tonight after russian president vladimir putin ban all adoption of russian children by americans. it is believed to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decadees, more than 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. when you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? >> i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little g
our efforts. >> reporter: state senator jerry hill was joined by chp and peninsula law enforcement to introduce senate bill 55 that would require second dui offenders to install an ignition interlocking device for a year. >> this bill will make it clear that if repeat offenders do not complete the ignition interlock program, then they will never get their license back. >> reporter: earlier this month the national transportation safety board recommended anyone convicted of drunk driving not just repeat offenders install the device. peninsula law enforcement say they back the senator's plan. >> 17 repeat offenders for dui arrests. each of those 17 have had their second offense. so this legislation that is being proposed today is actually needed to be added as part of the arsenal that we have. >> reporter: how it works is the driver breathes into the iid when they get in the car. if the device detects a blood alcohol level above a set limit, it keeps the car from starting. senator hill says california needs this type of stricter enforcement in our state. >> it makes no sense that a
's for it to be approved and signed into law. today's the 27th. the senate comes back in session today, the house is in pro-forma so it probably will not do any work. you only have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal -- ink a deal. the president took off last night from hawaii, but there's a five-hour time difference. time is working against these lawmakers. they will have to figure out something if they want to do anything before new year's. it seems quite likely that we are going to go over this cliff and that whatever happens is going to have to be resolved after january 1. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someo
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
there, you have to enforce the law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and
of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is for a vast future also." the words of abraham lincoln. jim from georgia on the republican line. caller: thank
year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automati
to the people of cuba. the helms-burton law was not as effective as i would have liked. >> another issue out you are associated with is autism. how did that get started? >> my grandson was a very normal child. when he was 18 months to two years old, he got nine shots in one day. seven of which had thimerosol, mercury. it is a preservative. in 1929 it was tested on the 29 people who had meningitis. they said that the mercury had no impact so they started using solutions.halmologic when children get a few vaccinations, it did not have a huge impact but they started to get as many as 25 or 30 before they get to the first grade. my grandson got nine in one day and he became artistic, banging his head against the wall. then diary and constipation -- diarrhea and constipation. he was doing terrible. i was not aware of autism and all but i was chairman of the committee that did the investigation so i started to looking into with health and human services and the food and drug administration and that is where i had four years of hearings on that and i became convinced that women -- that mercury, women w
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
. >> with that perspective, now that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized into law over the next couple years, we keep hearing those on the conservative side is concerns about what it will do to the country. what are your concerns? will this be a good thing? >> yes, it will. right now, we have $50 billion a year of uncompensated care. people who do not have insurance, do not have medicaid, medicare, private insurance, mode carry coverage, they are not insured. they have access to health care in emergency rooms and if they cannot pay, and they do not go to bankruptcy, it costs -- the care does not go away. it is shifted to the rest of us who do have insurance. $50 billion. it could be as much as $1,500 per person. paying for those who do not. you have everybody in the system all injured one way or another, then the uncompensated care goes away. it is no longer borne by those of us who are beneficiaries of an insurance program. that alone is a hidden tax people do not focus on unless it is pointed out to them. it raises the cost to everyone else. the fact never gets talked about. s
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
, at university of chicago, in all fields, in social science and in law and economics, so it's very much a respected foundation among researchers. c-span: they support you in this? is that... >> guest: they supported my faculty leave to complete this book. c-span: but then on the other side of it's the council on foreign relations. >> guest: and the council on foreign relations, where i am a fellow. and les gelb brought me on there. he's the president of it. and--and the council's been very supportive of--of what i've been doing this past year. and so there was no attempt to try to look balanced; it's just the life that i really am leading. c-span: so at--at what point in this process, from '96 until today, did this thing look like it was really going to take off? >> guest: we... c-span: when'd you get the contract? >> guest: oh, god, it wasn't very long ago. we got the contract in the fall of '90--the--we actually completed the contract in february of 2000 and turned the book in at the--the end of august of 2000, and then it came out a year later. c-span: so you worked on it for about t
in their own pockets or they become lobbyists. this secreted a law that they should not be able to become lobbyists for a few years sucker they leave congress or senate. they need to just bring america back up. if it would bring more jobs back to america, then we would have more taxes to be collected. host: more in the financial times this morning. capitol hill plays out a cliffhanger is the headline. the right the mood of the members matches the state of negotiations, l tempered, resentful and having their christmas breaks interrupted by another partisan budget impasse and in no frame of mind a compromise. we are talking about the senate negotiating a on the air. caller: thank you for taking my call. i am going to join the democrats, at least most of them, i hope. i am so disgusted and so disheartened. i feel that the republicans are being obstructionists on purpose. that is obvious. anyhow, they need to -- it is not about parties and politics anymore. it comes down to looking out for america. ok? host: why do you think they are being obstructionist? what do they have to gain by doing th
it could be vacancies and we could address that gap. there are six products of harvard law school and free products of your law school on the supreme court. they're currently there are currently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact, i think, actually. but those are what i hope or interesting facts about the supreme court erred greatly, i don't think they are very important. here is an important thing. if there is a take away here, have gotten to the point early that there were five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. it is true that the justices are supposed to look like and supposed to give the perception that they are all pretty much the same. but just as on the other side of the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states in court. and this is a moment of real partisan division of the supreme court. and that is exemplified in case after case. why this moment is so important, i think, you need to go back in history two diff
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)